Exploring Lisboa

I have to say Lisbon wasn’t on my top places to visit until very recently…mainly when I discovered it was one of the most consistently warm places in Europe and I had a Hen Do to plan! I didn’t think much of it. I just thought of it as “just another city” and oh man, was I wrong! I think I fell in love the second I got a taxi from the airport. I don’t normally get a taxi from the airport but the three bridesmaids were waiting for me to arrive so I wanted to get there ASAP. A quick note on that, if you can book a taxi in advance, I ended up waiting for about 15 minutes. And yes, at this point I realised it would have been quicker to get the metro but we live and learn.20170430_130655.jpgIn the morning, I popped down the road and get some freshly made pastries to take back to the apartment and all the girls. I did take a mini detour as it was so quiet I couldn’t resist seeing the Arco da Rua Augusta and Terreiro do Paço empty! Though it’s beautiful at anytime of day it’s great to see it so early. I would recommend getting up early on one of your days just to see the city in silence – there really is something beautiful about it.IMG-20170502-WA0044I love to walk (something my family still can’t believe having ones loathed it!) so I organised a good walk around the city. Starting at Carmo Convent, which is ruin of a church. Founded in 1389 it was the largest church in Lisbon but in 1755, an earthquake off the coast of Portugal caused significant damage. Today, it is a roofless nave open to the heavens, a gorgeous piece of history. The square on which it looks on to, Largo do Carmo, has some great little bars so we grabbed a seat, quite literally pulling them into the sun and some sangria – after all when in Lisboa… It was lovely just to sit, chat and watch people coming and going, a mixture of tourists and locals. IMG-20170729-WA0019Not long after we headed up to Miradouro de São Pedro de Alcântara, the gardens to Palacio Foz. They have the prettiest views! When we arrived there was a little market going on with food, drink and knick-knacks. It was incredibly touristy but still nice to look round and grab some food. It was so cheap! A massive ham and cheese sandwich with a beer for €5! Plus it tasted fantastic!IMG-20170502-WA0036After a nice chilled out lunch looking over Lisbon we headed on to Park Bar…it was pretty cool. Again touristy – but let’s be honest all rooftop bars are but we all still love them. Park is located on top of a multi-story car park. They don’t take reservations and they make it super clear that they don’t!! It was packed but we managed to squeeze onto a table! It overlooks the city, the river and the bell tower of Santa Catarina. It’s safe to say it was pretty spectacular. The booze wasn’t actually too pricey either and guess what, we had sangria!! Have you noticed a pattern here, views and booze.Screenshot_20170729-113747After a while we left to continue walking around the city. It is just beautiful to meander around, to look up, all the different tiles, the different floors, something different on every street. This is why I fell in love. It was genuinely such a gorgeous city. At this point though we realised were reminded as to why Lisbon is known for its seven hills…our calves were definitely feeling it! We headed back to our apartment to relax, shower and play some hen do games. Check out my blog here if you are looking for inspiration on Hen Do Activities. After much squealing, laughing and drinking we headed out. Drinking out was good fun, there is so many places to explore. Head over to FXFactory where there is a lot going on.Screenshot_20170729-113937The following morning a couple of us walked up to Castelo de S. Jorge. A Moorish Castle, approximately 1500 years old, with parts of the structure being built in the 6th Century! Though we didn’t realise you had to pay so we abandoned that and got Pastéis de Nata from Nata Lisboa which I have to say are a must! They were incredible. I want to move to Lisbon just for these!20170430_125626-e1501325157447.jpgJust around the corner from here is the best wine and food tasting! It worked out at about €35 pp. With this you got a bottle of red, white and wait for it…port…between…FOUR people!! Not just the the food was great and the service even better! We were there for about 2 and a half hours just taking it all in.IMG-20170502-WA0069Make sure you check out “Time Out Market”. It opened in May 2014, and has 35 kiosks selling regional specialities, such as Azeitão sheep’s cheese, flowers, Alentejo ham, sardines, wines and chocolates. Grab some food, some souvenirs (note – you can’t take sardines in your hand luggage, apparently they are classed as a liquid!) and take a load off your feet!

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There was still so much to see! I want to head back just to wonder down the small streets, take it all in all over again.

 

 

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Travel – is it ticking boxes or experiencing cultures? Asking and attempting to answer the question

This is a hard one to write. Are we travelling to tick boxes, to say we’ve been somewhere, to get that perfect Instagram picture or to learn about other cultures, to admire the natural world, to explore the untouched? Just because our experiences are different does it mean that theirs was wrong, or even ours was wrong?

I went off for 6 months with The Boy and went to South East Asia, Australia and New Zealand. The stick I got for picking those locations was ridiculous, upsetting and judging!

“Why do you want to go there? It’s so touristy? Everyone does that?”

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Yes I knew people that had been, in fact my stepbrother had done it years before me and the stories he came back with made me want to go. I wanted to see a different culture, eat different foods and see a new world, something I had never seen before. Yes, I did touristy things, but are things touristy just because a lot of people do them? Would you say Angkor Wat is touristy? No. So why is going to S.E.A classed as a touristy thing to do? Once you start digging (or lightly scrapping the surface) you can see why – drunk westerners in Bangkok, the Full Moon Parties and the Island Hoping. This isn’t the South East Asia I saw, this was “Lads on Tour”, “I want to lay on a beach”, “I need a tan to show I’ve been away”. Why have these people travelled so far to do something they could do in the South of France for a fraction of the cost? Have they come just to say they have been, and got that perfect Instagram picture?

“If it’s not on Social Media did it really happen?”

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Is this what we’ve become? Or are they trying something that doesn’t interest me? Am I wrong for judging people’s travels or holidays because I think they could have just done that at home, because it doesn’t seem “cultural” enough? I think that if you go somewhere, you respect their culture, just like I feel when people come to the UK. Respect is key. So as long as they are respectful why does it bother me that they are just partying and drinking? In my view we should want to travel to explore what makes our planet so beautiful, so diverse, and so original. I personally don’t think you get that at the bottom of a bottle. Some cultures have a lot of drinking in them, look at Ireland, and imagine visiting and not having a pint of Guinness. But Ireland isn’t just about the black stuff, it’s about its history, Vikings, scenery, religion and so so so much more. A beach is just a beach unless you explore the area around it. A city just a city if you don’t go into the buildings. A country is just another ticked box if you don’t find out what that country is about. In my view, don’t go to a country just to do what you would do at home…

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I also know some people pick their location based on the land mass they can scratch off on their map. When I first heard this is how they were picking their next trip it was hard not to laugh. It sounded so ridiculous to spend all that money to go somewhere just because it’s a big land mass to show off on your map. Why not read about different places and pick from that? But then I started to thinking about it more. If you know you want to see the world and you can’t decide where to start why not start by picking large countries? Then do your research on that country? Can you really go wrong, you’re still going to see the culture of somewhere new? I suddenly felt bad about the fact I had been that judgy person. If you want to see the world does it matter how you choose your location? I mean, I made a promise to myself that I would visit one new country every year but why a new one, why not go back to something I loved? Because I want to experience somewhere new, or because I want to have another country ticked off. And if I am honest, it’s both. When I’m old and grey I want to look back at all the places I’ve been to, to have got as close to seeing all 196 countries (and yes I’m including Taiwan as its own country) as I possibly could. But not just to say I have been there, to have seen as many cultures as I can, to try new things, to eat and learn to cook new foods.

Yes travel, pick your location however you want, but don’t go somewhere because you feel you have to, go because YOU want to. Explore what that country has to offer, do those touristy things, and learn something new.